Yvonne Arnaud

THREE sisters arrive at their remote childhood home on the eve of their mother’s funeral.This is the setting for Shelagh Stephenson’s The Memory of Water, which comes to the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre, Guildford, from Tuesday 21 May to Saturday 25 May.

Having grown apart, the siblings argue and joke as they sort through their mother’s belongings and gradually confide about the realities of their own adult lives. But it’s when they move on to childhood recollections that they discover they remember things differently, leading to a series of dramatic and devastating revelations.

Theatregoers should expect tears and laughter from a cast which includes Juliet Cowan (Cuckoo, EastEnders, Shameless), Nicholas Bailey (EastEnders) and Stewart Wright(People Like Us, Love and Marriage).

CORONATION Street star Georgia May Foote is heading to Surrey direct from Broadway, and prior to a London run, to star in the coming-of-age drama Napoli, Brooklyn.

Set in 1960 Brooklyn, New York, it tells the story of Nic and Luda Muscolino, who have raised three proud and passionate daughters, each of them bonded by a fierce love for one another and harbouring a secret longing that could tear the family apart.


SISTER ACT – The Muscolino girls are tested by a New York tragedy in Napoli, Brooklyn

When an earth-shattering event rocks their neighbourhood, life comes to a screeching halt and the Muscolino sisters are forced to confront their conflicting visions for the future.

Foote is best known for playing Katy Armstrong in Corrie, but fans will also remember her as Alison Simmons in Grange Hill and later as runner-up in Strictly Come Dancing.

Napoli, Brooklyn, comes to the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre, Guildford, from Monday 13 May until Saturday 18 May.

Playwright Meghan Kennedy said: Napoli, Brooklyn is loosely based on my mother’s adolescence. She grew up in a big, Italian Catholic immigrant family. It’s a story of immigrants finding their identities and coming to a new understanding of what home truly means.

“It’s women taking risks that will come to define a generation. But the issues each member of that family faced still exist now.”