surrey police

AN investigation is underway after a fire broke out at a former pub in Knaphill on Sunday evening.

The former Robin Hood Pub ablaze

Police were called to the site of the former Robin Hood pub in Robin Hood Road around 5.55pm.

“A cordon remains in place this morning while we continue with our enquiries in conjunction with Surrey Fire and Rescue Service to establish the circumstances of the fire,” said a police spokesman.

“We are keen to hear from anyone who may have seen anything suspicious in the area around the time of the incident, or anyone with any other information, to contact us as a matter of urgency. If you can help, please contact us on 101, quoting crime reference number PR/45190049280.”

For more details and pictures, see this Thursday’s (16 May) edition of the News & Mail

TACKLING modern slavery and firearms and violence offences has won an award for one of the police officers who works in the Surrey Heath villages.

PC Anna Whiteside received a Chief Constable’s Commendation for the way she dealt with crimes committed at a site in Bagshot.

PC Anna Whiteside and PS Jon Castell with their certificates of commendation

Along with Sergeant Jon Castell, she gathered evidence which led to two men being identified as potential victims of modern slavery and their removal to a place of safety.

A Surrey Police spokesman said: “PC Whiteside and PS Castell worked hard with local authorities and partner agencies to gather intelligence to progress this long running case.

“They visited regularly to carry out welfare checks on the victims as well as to gather evidence, often receiving intimidation and violence from the offenders.

“Thanks to the officer’s hard work, dedication, bravery and determination, the local authorities have been able to continue their work in bringing this case to a successful conclusion. It has resulted in a number of arrests and the land concerned being able to be returned to the council.”

PC Whiteside and PS Castell were presented with commendation certificates by the then-acting chief constable, Gavin Stephens.

PC Whiteside, whose patch includes Chobham, Bisley, West End and Windlesham, said: “I am thrilled to have received this award and to have this work recognised.

“Jon and I have worked hard with the local council to help protect the vulnerable members of the community, as well as the wider community as a whole.”

MORE than 100 knives were handed in during the recent week-long amnesty in Surrey.

“Tackling knife crime is a daily priority for Surrey Police, and our involvement and support of Operation Sceptre, a national anti-knife crime campaign, has proved a success once again,” said a Surrey Police spokesman.

Knife banks were set up so carriers could hand in their weapons safely without fear of prosecution

“Officers have been visiting schools and continuing to engage with communities to highlight the choices people have, and the dangers of carrying a knife.”

Knife banks were located at Woking, Guildford, Reigate and Staines Police Stations, giving knife carriers the opportunity to hand the blades in without fear of questions being asked or prosecution. A total of 108 weapons were surrendered during the week in March.

“We are determined to steer our young people away from a culture of violence and to break the cycle as we have seen the devastating effect knife crime has on people’s lives both across the country and here in Surrey,” said Chief Inspector Mark Offord.

For the full story get today’s (4 March) edition of the News & Mail

CHILDREN from across Woking borough learned valuable life skills and how to keep safe and healthy during Junior Citizen courses held throughout March.

A series of fun and informative sessions were staged for primary school pupils taking part in the in the long-running safety programme.

Pupils escape from a smoke filled room in a “burning house”

The course, held at Woking Football Club’s ground in Kingfield, is organised by members of the Safer Woking Partnership.

It is supported by Surrey Fire and Rescue Service, Surrey Police, British Transport Police, Woking Borough Council, New Vision Homes, the football club and the Children and Family Health Service.

The children found out what it is like to enter a room that is on fire and a “stranger danger” session was led by police officers.

British Transport Police raised awareness of the hazards around railway lines and a new session for 2019 run by the Children and Family Health Service had advice on healthy eating and the dangers of consuming too much sugar.

Jane Spong, head of youth and community at Woking Football Club, said: “We are always very impressed by the mature way in which the young people who pass through the doors handle each different situation, whilst still having fun.”

For the full story get the 28 March edition of the News & Mail

WOKING Police Station is to be closed down and its site in Station Approach sold.

The move follows the £20.5 million purchase by Surrey Police of an office complex in Leatherhead, which will replace Mount Browne in Guildford as the force headquarters.

Surrey Police and Crime Commissioner David Munro

Temporary Chief Constable Gavin Stephens said the eventual closure and sale of the Woking station would not affect local police provision, pointing out the officers based at the station are members of central Surrey-wide teams.

“Our changes in location will not alter how we respond to, work with, and consider ourselves a part of, Surrey’s many communities.”

David Munro, the Police and Crime Commissioner for Surrey, said: “This is really exciting news and heralds the start of a new chapter in the proud history of Surrey Police.

“Some of our current buildings, including the Mount Browne HQ site, are outdated, poor quality, in the wrong place and expensive to manage and maintain.”

For the full story get the 28 March edition of the News & Mail

WOKING borough commander Detective Inspector Andy Greaves has said targeting drug-related crime is the priority for local police.

“Drugs are the threads that affects so much crime in the borough,” he told a community meeting in Knaphill last week.

Woking borough commander Detective Inspector Andy Greaves

DI Greaves said this included drug-related violence in the town centre, especially some of the takeaways in Chertsey Road and in surrounding streets where people had been stabbed and seriously injured.

“Walton Court in Sheerwater is a hub of criminal activity, including drug-dealing violence. We have obtained a number of closure orders to protect vulnerable residents from gangs coming in, particularly from London and South Coast.”

“Walton Court in Sheerwater is a hub of criminal activity, including drug-dealing violence. We have obtained a number of closure orders to protect vulnerable residents from gangs coming in, particularly from London and South Coast.”

The Knaphill meeting had been called because of concern about a rise in antisocial behaviour and thefts in the area. DI Greaves added that while reported crime had reduced by 1.5% since last year, there were significant spikes, including a 5.3% increase in drug-related violence and a 7.4% rise in domestic violence.

For the full story get the 14 March edition of the News & Mail

SURREY Police are increasing reassurance patrols around Woking’s mosque following the terrorist attack in New Zealand.

Neighbourhood officers are visiting the Shah Jahan Mosque as well as mosques in Camberley, Reigate and Redhill, and will be providing reassurance and advice to communities.

The Shah Jahan Mosque will see extra police patrols after anti-Islamic terrorist attack in New Zealand

Chief Superintendent Neil Honnor, Head of the Surrey and Sussex Joint Operations Command said: “We stand together with our Muslim communities and all those shocked and horrified by this terrorist attack in New Zealand.

“Today in Surrey and Sussex we are stepping up reassurance patrols around mosques and increasing engagement with communities of all faiths, giving advice on how people and places can protect themselves.

“Places of worship can also use our online training package ‘ACT Awareness eLearning’ for advice on Protective Security and how to react should the worst happen. It can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/news/act-awareness-elearning.

“We also encourage everyone to be aware of our Run, Hide, Tell advice.

“We take all forms of extremism seriously and anyone with concerns about someone becoming radicalised can get advice and support through the PREVENT programme at www.TLAI.info.”

“We advise the public to remain vigilant. If you see or hear something suspicious, trust your instincts and ACT. Report it to police in confidence via gov.uk/ACT and to report any suspicious behaviour or activity to police, in confidence via gov.uk/ACT or 0800 789 321. In an emergency the public should always call 999. If you get caught up in the event of a weapons attack we urge you to follow the Run, Hide, Tell advice.”

For more on this story see the 21 March edition on the News & Mail

JEWELLERY and antiques worth hundreds of thousands of pounds have been stolen in a burglary in Woking.

Two rings and a pair of earrings were taken from a bedroom of the house in Hockering Road.

STOLEN: Bronze La Rosee figure

Two antique figures and a Georgian tea caddy were also taken.

One of the figures is a bronze La Rosee, possibly made in the late 19th century and 70cm (2ft 4in) tall, and the other a bronze winged statue, inscribed “H’Dailion” and measuring 50m (1ft 8in).

STOLEN: The yellow and white gold ring with sapphire

The jewellery consisted of a pair of diamond pendant earrings in platinum, handmade by Baileys of Horsell, an 18ct yellow and white gold claw set stone sapphire and diamond ring and a three-stone brilliant cut diamond claw set platinum ring.

A Surrey Police spokesman said that officers were called around 2.50pm on Monday this week after reports of a break-in.

“Have you been offered any jewellery or antiques for sale matching the descriptions above? If you have, or you can help us with any other information, please call 101 (999 in an emergency) and or report it online via http://surrey.police.uk/TellUsMore , quoting the reference number PR/45190014823,” he added.

For the full story and pictures get the 14 March edition of the News & Mail

YOUNG people who carry weapons have been warned they are putting themselves at risk of serious harm, during a national week of action to tackle knife crime.

Surrey Police say that while knife crime remains low locally, much of what does take place is related to drugs and gang activity, some of which spills over the border from London. The force says it is working hard to tackle and prevent the threat of “county lines” gangs who are using young people in local towns to spread their supply network.

Police and Crime Commissioner David Munro

“We must continue to raise awareness, particularly amongst young people, that carrying a blade can have fatal consequences. The message to those who carry a knife, or are thinking of carrying one, is that a knife does not protect you. It will make you more vulnerable placing you in danger of serious harm,” said the Police and Crime Commissioner for Surrey, David Munro.

“We must ensure that education, social care and public health are all factored into our plans to work together to combat the underlying root causes which is why I am looking forward to seeing the county’s knife crime strategy in the next few weeks.”

Superintendent Peter Fulton, force lead for Violent Crime, said: “As part of our #OpSceptre campaign, we are giving people the opportunity to surrender their knives or weapons without fear of prosecution or questions being asked for one week only.

“Knife bins are located at police stations in Woking and Guildford until 17 March, to enable people to give up their weapons safely. Last year in Surrey there were two amnesties which resulted in a total of 166 weapons being handed in.”

Anyone with information on knife crime should call 101 or report online. In an emergency always dial 999.

For the full story get the 14 March edition of the News & Mail

A SUCCESSFUL meeting of Knaphill residents addressed by the Police and Crime Commissioner for Surrey and the police borough commander, could lead to regular similar gatherings across Woking.

DI Andy Greaves addressing the meeting on Monday

The meeting at Knaphill Baptist Church on Monday evening was organised by borough councillor Melanie Whitehand and attended by more than 40 residents who heard presentations from David Munro, the PCC, and Detective Inspector Andy Greaves.

Topics discussed included a perceived increase in anti-social behaviour and burglaries in the area.

The PCC said that the police neighbourhood teams would be doubled in size after the increase in the police precept part of the 2019/20 council tax.

“People say they don’t see enough officers and the reason is that there aren’t enough of them because we haven’t got the money to pay for them.

“One of our aims is to get back on the streets with the resources we’ve got. Antisocial behaviour is sometimes called a low-level crime but it isn’t low level at all to people who suffer it.”

DI Greaves said a good way of dealing with youths causing disruption to residents and businesses was for the local authority to issue a public space protection order. This order could then be enforced if breached, as the police had to follow a process, especially when dealing with children.

For the full story get the 7 March edition of the News & Mail – for more on tackling knife crime, see the 14 March edition available this Thursday